Teaching Tips

By Neil Root
Neil Root is a writer and London based English Language teacher with 10 years experience.

Balancing Learning and Fun

By D. Sharon Pruitt from Hill Air Force Base, Utah, USA (Sunset Party Dancing Girl Silhouette) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Teenagers need stimulation as they live in their own world, as we once did. Your job as a summer school EFL teacher is to enter their world, but also to invite them into your well-prepared teaching world. This is a difficult balance, and doesn’t always happen automatically, but it’s essential to work at it if you want to get the most out of a teen group and they the best learning experience you can offer.

Continue reading »

By Neil Root
Neil Root is a writer and London based English Language teacher with 10 years experience.

Presenting grammar

Grammar is essential for teenagers, as they are still formulating the language, and if they get their structures solid early they will become fluent later. Each student of course has a different level of ability, depending on their learning background, natural aptitude and personality. Your job is to take all your students with you on a learning experience which enriches them, stimulates them and strengthens their English.

Continue reading »

By Neil Root
Neil Root is a writer and London based English Language teacher with 10 years experience.

Teen students

By Tgyeltshen (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Most TEFL summer schools involve teaching groups of teenagers, and it can be a very rewarding experience. Younger students often show quick progress and the enthusiasm and energy in the classroom can be infectious. But class management and maintaining control can be tricky and the following are a few tips about what to do and not do to have a successful summer school EFL teaching experience.

Continue reading »

by Amy Harris

5 Ways to Make Your English Language Lessons More Teen-friendly

By user:sj (Happy_face_ball.jpg) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)], via Wikimedia Commons

Teaching teenagers can be a challenge, however they will be only too aware that learning the English language is the gateway to many opportunities for them in the future and they should therefore be keen to engage.

Continue reading »

by Manjusha Nambiar

How To Teach Formal And Informal Language

People speak and write in different ways on different occasions. In Indian languages, for example, there are some complicated rules about how to speak to older people. English doesn’t have a system of this kind. However, in English too, some words and expressions are mainly used in formal situations. There are also words and expressions that are only used in informal situations. Writing tends to be formal whereas speech is usually informal. Here are a few tips to teach formal and informal language to your students.

Continue reading »

A day out with students in London

by Jonathan Last @JonathanLast1
TEFL teacher and author of Teaching English with Chopsticks: TEFL from the Frontline

Learning a language is an active pursuit.  It’s not about abstract theory – even if it has theory – but rather it is grounded in the real world as one of the most practical things you can study.  Commanding a new dialect, being able to read, write, listen and speak it as well as understanding context, is about learning to interact with the environment around you.

Continue reading »

By Daniela Pesconi-Arthur

Hi again!

studentsIn my last article I mentioned an activity I used with my students and some photos they had taken of when they saw the Queen. Today I’m going to explain how you can do it too. You– and your students – are going to love it! Discussing pictures, videos and other documents will never be the same again, and your students will love to “show off” to parents and friends! It’s not complicated at all! Let’s go step by step.

Continue reading »

By Daniela Pesconi-Arthur

I imagine that teaching teenagers is one of most teachers’ biggest nightmares. Especially if these teenagers come from the same country, from the same school and will be in the same group while studying abroad. Uh-oh… What are the problems a summer course teacher is likely to encounter? Let’s take a look:

  • Daniela's ClassAll your students (or most of them) speak the same language (not English, obviously);
  •  Most of these students will insist on communicating in their own language;
  •  Mobile phones, cameras, iPods and other types of gadgets will probably be more interesting to them than learning the Present Perfect Continuous; and so on.

So you might be asking yourself: what should I do? Don’t panic, I’d say. If this is not your first time teaching at summer school, you will be just fine, like the previous years. However, if this IS your first summer school, you might be a bit apprehensive. I don’t blame you at all.

Continue reading »